Soapbox: Superman – 7 Weird Superpowers (And 8 Weaknesses) He Only Has In The Movies

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No matter who’s wearing the cape, big screen Supes always seems to get new powers!

Superman has an impressive array of superpowers – even by superhero standards. Since he first debuted in 1938, the Man of Steel’s abilities have developed dramatically, to the point where the character’s detractors argue that his adventures are no longer entertaining.

After all, these days, Superman moves many times faster than a speeding bullet, and is far more powerful than any locomotive. As for skyscrapers? He doesn’t leap over them so much as soar.

This presents a challenge for writers: how can they make Superman’s struggles compelling, when the guy can do pretty much anything? Over the past few decades, solutions have included everything from decreasing the upper limits of his powers to beefing up those of the enemies he faces.

Critics are divided over whether either of these approaches is the right one – or whether the answer really lies with writers getting more creative. Nevertheless, the one thing everyone – writers and readers alike – seems to agree on is that the last thing Superman needs is more superpowers.

Apparently, this doesn’t extend to the filmmakers behind the various Superman moviesthough, who have a perplexing habit of attributing new abilities – and, more understandably – weaknesses to our hero. What’s more, many of these new strengths and vulnerabilities come across as downright strange – even for a character who can fire microwaves out of his eyes!

With this in mind, here are 7 Weird Superpowers (And 8 Weaknesses) Superman Only Has In The Movies.

This post was written exclusively for Screen Rant – click here to read the full article

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Soapbox: Superman – 7 Weird Superpowers (And 8 Weaknesses) He Only Has In The Movies

Soapbox: 17 Ways Batman V Superman Was Almost Completely Different

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No matter what else changed, these guys still ended up at each other’s throats!

When Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice arrived in cinemas back in 2016, it represented a landmark moment. Sure, both the Dark Knight and the Man of Steel had already appeared in films previously, but never before had DC’s two biggest icons – undeniably the two most famous and influential superheroes of all time – shared the big screen together.

Unsurprisingly, given the pair’s history of comic book team-ups, Warner Bros. had previously attempted to feature both Superman and Batman in the same live-action movie. Of these failed efforts, the most significant – which is to say, “bigger than a cameo” – was Superman vs. Batman, which was in development between 2001-2002.

Written by Se7en screenwriter Andrew Kevin Walker (with rewrites by A Beautiful Mind scribe Akiva Goldsman) and with Troy’s Wolfgang Peterson set to direct, Superman vs. Batman is at once similar and wildly different to Batman v Superman.

Although the plots of both films call for a showdown between the two legends and count Lex Luthor among the main villains, that’s pretty much where the similarities end.

Here are 17 Ways Batman V Superman Was Almost Completely Different.

This post was written exclusively for Screen Rant – click here to read the full article

Soapbox: 17 Ways Batman V Superman Was Almost Completely Different

Soapbox: Suicide Squad – How not every movie is for you and why critics aren’t the bad guys

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This is pretty much what defensive fans looked like when the reviews rolled in…

We recently crossed the halfway mark for September, which means that for many people, Suicide Squad is well and truly old news.

However, thanks to the IT issues that brought The Pop Culture Studio shuddering to halt for most of last month, I still haven’t had my say on that movie and the furore that surrounded it – and believe me, I have PLENTY to share.

Continue reading “Soapbox: Suicide Squad – How not every movie is for you and why critics aren’t the bad guys”

Soapbox: Suicide Squad – How not every movie is for you and why critics aren’t the bad guys

Live From The Pop Culture Studio: Super(hero) Heavyweight Championship – Superman vs Batman

After many months spent teasing the next big thing from The Pop Culture Studio, I’m pleased to announce that the future is here: Live From The Pop Culture Studio, a regular series of video updates about movies, TV shows, comics and more.

This first installment in the series – which looks at the Man of Steel/Dark Knight showdown on everyone’s lips right now thanks to Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – should give you a taste of what these updates are all about, even if it also makes it pretty clear they’re not actually recorded live…

Continue reading “Live From The Pop Culture Studio: Super(hero) Heavyweight Championship – Superman vs Batman”

Video

Anatomy Lesson: At Midnight All the Agents…

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Thank heavens for tastefully positioned dressing gowns…

Chances are if you’ve only ever read one comic book in your life, it will have been Watchmen.

Created by writer Alan Moore and artist Dave Gibbons and published by DC Comics, Watchmen is frequently held out as one of the finest examples of the medium’s potential, and its psychologically nuanced take on superheroes in the “real” world continues to make it accessible to comics newbies and die-hard fans alike.

For better or worse, the book – along with The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller, Klaus Janson and Lynn Varley – has defined the face of “capes and tights” comics for the next 30 years, which serves as a pretty solid indication of just how influential it was (and still is).

Something that often comes up when discussing Watchmen is how cinematic it feels, and certainly, an argument could be made that it is to comics what Citizen Kane is to cinema.

As with that film, Moore and Gibbons haven’t simply invented new storytelling tricks (although they certainly do plenty of that), but also brought numerous existing techniques together to build one cohesive story, the end result of which is nothing short of dazzling.

And yet, as much as Watchmen shows us how similar comics can be to film, it was also designed – as Moore himself noted – to highlight the ways the two differ, and to showcase what comics can do that movies simply can’t.

A perfect example of this can be seen in the opening sequence of the book’s first chapter, “At Midnight All The Agents…”, which forms the basis for this month’s Anatomy Lesson feature.

Continue reading “Anatomy Lesson: At Midnight All the Agents…”

Anatomy Lesson: At Midnight All the Agents…