Soapbox: 15 ‘Tough’ Movie Characters Who Always Get Defeated

Wolverine-Hugh-Jackman
Turns out Logan might not be the best there is at what he does after all…

Everybody loves a movie tough guy or gal – powerful characters with a reputation for being able to win virtually any fight. Yet a surprising number of these iconic fighters have actually lost almost as many battles as they’ve won (at least based on what we see on screen).

Of course, a large part of this is down to the way that films work. In order for a story to be compelling, our heroes need to struggle – and even occasionally lose! – despite their incredible martial prowess. Similarly, in most instances, villains need to be defeated before the credits roll – which means that they are predestined to be second best, no matter how many times they’ve beaten the hero throughout the story.

That’s why most movie powerhouses earn their street cred by mowing down unfortunate redshirts, only to end up on the wrong end of a brutal beatdown when faced by an opponent at least as skilled as they are: because they’re really only as good at fighting as the story needs them to be at any given moment.

But even taking into account the mechanics of storytelling, you’d be amazed by just how patchy the win-loss record for some of cinema’s most well-known heavy hitters really is.

Don’t believe us? Then check out this list of 15 ‘Tough’ Movie Characters Who Always Get Defeated – we promise you: you won’t believe who made the cut!

This post was written exclusively for Screen Rant – click here to read the full article

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Soapbox: 15 ‘Tough’ Movie Characters Who Always Get Defeated

Soapbox: 10 Best (And 10 Worst) Comic Book Plot Twists, Ranked

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I like to picture these guys at opposite ends of the same chessboard right now…

Given comics is a largely serialized medium, it’s not surprising that its history is filled with brilliant – and not-so-brilliant! – plot twists. After all, what better way to entice readers to read the next chapter than with an earth-shattering last page cliffhanger that leaves them thinking “How are they ever gonna resolve this?!”

There’s also few things more rewarding as a fan than seeing a meticulously crafted – and cleverly hidden – plot twist come to fruition. It’s the thrill of being surprised, combined with the satisfaction of knowing that the writer involved has played fair by providing ample little hints in the lead up to the big reveal.

Of course, some comic book plot twists are better executed than others. Indeed, more than a few have fallen flat, often because they either made no sense, or actively damaged decades worth of stories that proceeded them.

In instances like these, it sometimes seems like the twist was designed more from a shock value point of view, rather than as a payoff designed to enrich past and future adventures. Still, regardless of whether a major comic book reveal was outstanding or underwhelming, they’re almost always memorable.

With this in mind, we’ve taken a look back at 20 of comic’s biggest narrative surprises, in order to round up this list of the 10 Best (And 10 Worst) Comic Book Plot Twists of all time.

This post was written exclusively for Screen Rant – click here to read the full article

Soapbox: 10 Best (And 10 Worst) Comic Book Plot Twists, Ranked

Anatomy Lesson: At Midnight All the Agents…

Watchmen_Comedian_death
Thank heavens for tastefully positioned dressing gowns…

Chances are if you’ve only ever read one comic book in your life, it will have been Watchmen.

Created by writer Alan Moore and artist Dave Gibbons and published by DC Comics, Watchmen is frequently held out as one of the finest examples of the medium’s potential, and its psychologically nuanced take on superheroes in the “real” world continues to make it accessible to comics newbies and die-hard fans alike.

For better or worse, the book – along with The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller, Klaus Janson and Lynn Varley – has defined the face of “capes and tights” comics for the next 30 years, which serves as a pretty solid indication of just how influential it was (and still is).

Something that often comes up when discussing Watchmen is how cinematic it feels, and certainly, an argument could be made that it is to comics what Citizen Kane is to cinema.

As with that film, Moore and Gibbons haven’t simply invented new storytelling tricks (although they certainly do plenty of that), but also brought numerous existing techniques together to build one cohesive story, the end result of which is nothing short of dazzling.

And yet, as much as Watchmen shows us how similar comics can be to film, it was also designed – as Moore himself noted – to highlight the ways the two differ, and to showcase what comics can do that movies simply can’t.

A perfect example of this can be seen in the opening sequence of the book’s first chapter, “At Midnight All The Agents…”, which forms the basis for this month’s Anatomy Lesson feature.

Continue reading “Anatomy Lesson: At Midnight All the Agents…”

Anatomy Lesson: At Midnight All the Agents…